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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
, in for shepard smith. we're live in newtown, connecticut, small town, 90 minutes north of manhattan that right now is dealing with the aftermath of an unspeakable crime. the murder of innocent children. it happened at sandy hook elementary, connecticut state police saying a gunman walked into that k through fourth grade school earlier today, around 9:30 local time, and opened fire. investigators say he murdered 20 children and six adults. >> the kids were terrified. they were terrified. they had just witnessed something and they terrified. >> many of them were friends of ours and people we socialize with. it's painful right now. >> 20 children. this image shows connecticut state police leading children away from the school, each of their small hands on the shoulders of the children in front of them as they walk from the scene where a mad man killed their friends. this woman was on the phone waiting to hear about her sister a teacher at the school. we do not know tonight what happened to her sister, whether or not she's alive or among the dozens of dead inside that building. reports indicate th
's a growing sense from many residents that newtown, connecticut, should grieve without a spotlight. >> even a local newspaper there posted a facebook message, asking colleagues from the media to simply stay away from the victims. no media, and no press signs are taped up throughout the town. the "denver post" reports the parents of a little boy who ran past the shooter before his classmates were killed also put up a sign. they say every time the doorbell rang, the little boy thought the gunman had found him. >>> many communities are finding closer connections to newtown than they knew. >> in asheville, north carolina, residents released dozens of balloons remembering the victims. in particular, one, the child cough an asheville high grad. caroline previdi was the daughter of sandy johnson previdi who graduated back in 1991. her classmates reflected on their friend's loss. >> she was a graduate of asheville high. so that affected us even more so. >> it hits real close to home, it really does. i just want -- i hope the families to know that we're praying for them. >> sandy's friends are creat
this morning. the latest is coming up in a second. from accuweather the story of the week, in connecticut, that tragedy. and one week after the massacre, how the nation will pause today and remember the victims as the debate over gun violence continues to intensify around the country. another somber occasion in what's been an extraordinarily somber week. >> for me it doesn't even feel like a week. >> no. and you can imagine in newtown, it doesn't feel anything like christmas should feel. just horribly sad. we'll bring you the latest coming up in a second. >>> also this morning, the people who are insisting that the end of the world is happening today, all this talk about the end of the mayan calendar has some people doing some rather drastic things. >> so far so good. we're looking all right. >> we're here. >> we'll see what the rest of the day brings. it's been fun in case we're not here later. >>> and later, if there is a later, simon cowell has a brand new reality of his own. something is going on behind the scenes and it involves someone very special. you will not believe who simon co
. schedule your free package pickup today. >>> a connecticut lawyer is getting heavy criticism because he wants to sue the state over the newtown school shooting. he insists he wants safer schools, not money. >> hello, wi didn't do enough. this never should have happened. >>> this morning jack ford looks at the claims behind this controversial lawsuit. >>> and an fl coach makes it back to the sidelines just three months after learning he has cancer. chuck pagano talks about beating leukemia and leading the indianapolis colts to the playoffs on "cbs this morning." [ female announcer ] jump-start your day with mcdonald's dollar menu at breakfast. home of the irresistible sausage burrito. ♪ ♪ and freshly brewed premium roast coffee you love. plus other amazing tastes for just a dollar each. ♪ ♪ every day, as always, there's a lot to love for a little on mcdonald's dollar menu. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [ crowd cheering ] [ man ] touchdown confirmed. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [ mouse clicks ] it's time to
will be senator blumenthal from connecticut. we are so delighted that you could be here. go right ahead. >> thank you very much. i want to thank you and ranking member and half for today's hearing. my colleagues to have stated so eloquently what happened in new york and new jersey, connecticut , share their faith although the lack -- national media coverage may give the impression that connecticut's damage was more a footnote to the main story. in fact, the destruction and damage in connecticut was every bit as real, and the pockets of destruction as pervasive as elsewhere, and i think many of the lessons learned the you heard here form a pattern that we need to invest now or pay later. there are measures that we can take now to minimize the damage in the future, and we cannot be penny wise to avoid those measures going forward, and the other lesson that i think it's striking here is that our efforts have to be complementary, not competitive. we are mutually supportive in this effort. i have been asked repeatedly, argue in competition with new jersey and new york? the answer is emphatically now.
of the civilian pension connecticut affect medicaid and lots of other programs like that and the budget cut likes the idea because it saves money. it doesn't save that much at first but it saves a lot of money over time and i guess a little for to entered the league in the first ten years and more after that the savings continue to grow and grow. advocates for older americans don't like this idea very much at all because the savings are so big that means they are getting less money each month and in their benefits each year. >> so there's the question of what it means for the retirees beneficiary right now in the next couple of years and the on going into the future and then the president sending the measure of what would mean across the government. what do democrats think of this? you mentioned might be amenable to it but what about the house democrats, where do they stand? >> you had congressman larsen on here and you heard what he said not including social security and peace talks. that is a common belief of opinion among the democrats on the hill and in both the senate and house of would be a
york, the people of connecticut in particular, others as well, have sustained a very, very damaging blow both corporately and individually. we need to act on that. historically supplementals are not paid for, are passed so that we can meet the immediate need. mr. crowley will speak to that. but let me say this. the answer to your question is it's part of the math. if we're going to put our country on a fiscally sustainable path, we're going to have to consider all the expenditures we made, whether we paid for them initially or not, we're going to have to put that into the math and it needs to be a part of the agreement. i've said this is a math problem. certainly the dollars we spend will have to be accounted for and will have to be paid for over a longer period of time. but we can amortize that immediate expense that we need to make on behalf of the severely adversely affected damaged areas, we need to make that expenditure now. but we need to pay for that over the longer term. so to that extent, yes, it will be part of the -- for my own standpoint, part of the math that will have
rhode island, eastern massachusetts and also portions of eastern connecticut snow possible new england region we could be looking up to a foot of snow out there. by sunday gone. it will be windy behind it and much colder. >> dave: that's the exactly what i need for my 4 a.m. commute tomorrow morning. thank you very much molina, bearer of bad news. >> juliet: hotel room time. let's get to some headlines. cops releasing video of the woman pushing a man in front of a subway train. she was talking to herself. cops have released this footage running away from the subway station. three cops were shot. prison worker eddie jones iii being processed on domestic violence and stalking charges. that's when he tackled officer, took her gun and began hiring. the officer who raced to her being hailed as heros. >> there are actions of protecting the community quickly escalated from responding to a call for service to performances of heroic actions by members of this police department. >> officers ruth burns and kevin stein both out of the hospital. officer james garber is also expected to be okay. the
will runbe in the other direction. you know whyed they did it? in the aftermath of connecticut a lot of people think people with a lot of guns, well, you know what? it's a public safety issue. do i want to live near people with a young of guns with arsenal basement? >> eric: where is safer, the area with all the guns or without guns? >> juan: unlike you, i don't goins and i feel safer without guns. >> eric: three dots. that suburb they posted had thousands. the one with three dots or the one with thousand dots is more safe than new york city? >> juan: obviously not. the odds are that you will shoot your wife or the wife will shoot you. i'm just telling you, that is who uses the gun. or adam lanza shows up -- no, bad guys. you have fantasies about bad guys. it wish they had dots forthe bad guys who had the guns. kilthat is the point -- >> kimberly: that is the point. >> juan:be in my neighborhood bad guys with the guns who are intimidating, maiming. >> why are gun owners treated the way the sex offenders are? why do they take a data base to monitor them in the nefarious way. >> juan:
at that morning star next to the crescent moon. i thought kober. the connecticut regiment would have seen that here in brooklyn getting ready to go to white plains and again, it's dopey at least when i do it but suddenly it's that raw moment where wow, we are all tiny things. >> you talked about in your book how different areas have different revolutions but it's the same revolution but they go at it from different ways. one of the constants of the american revolution seems to be people's perceptions of washington and i'm just wondering, you stay away from the big figures and put the spotlight where it belongs on the landscape of the small people, but washington is a figure in your vote. do you come to any conclusions about this man? do come away liking him or not liking him? >> probably i mean -- >> you say he did and when the revolution. he managed not to lose up what to think is a great line. >> i think is a genius stroke. -had great conversations with artists about the revolution and there is this idea that art and ritual and reenactment, the things we used to engage with our past so
york city, for instance. >> dave: new jersey, connecticut. >> clayton: you're not living the dream. >> juliet: it's sort of subjective. well, actually not subjective you can look exactly at what people live here for 250 or people in san francisco, another expensive city, it doesn't go that long, didn't go that far. >> dave: the bottom line, it appears they've moved the goal post and it may be around the $400,000 mark and that may be the new 250 if you will. may be where ne get the deal done. and upwards towards the 500 mark, but here are two congressmen on perhaps moving this up. >> the $400,000 level seems to me to be about right, that represents about the top 1% of the income earners, the people who got 93% of the income growth our last year and that seems to be enough, but i think there's some flexibility there. >> it's about making sure that we can live within our means and address the real problem and that's spending. i kind of feel like i'm a lifeguard and we've got to save as many people from drowning in higher taxes as we can. >> clayton: that seems to be the new threshold
, connecticut, 1837. c-span: what were his parents like? >> guest: his father was a very successful merchant, junius spencer morgan, who worked in hartford and then boston, and then moved to london in 1854 to become an anglo-american merchant banker. and he and pierpont, basically, were funneling european capital to the emerging american economy. i mean, we really were the emerging economy in the 19th century. he was very conservative, very upright, very much concerned to build an international banking dynasty that would rival the rothschilds and baring brothers, and he did. i mean, over the next 80 years, the morgan bank--especially in america--rothschild didn't really see what america was going to be. they had one man, august belmont, who was very good. but junius morgan staked the future on his son and on america. he was very, very supervisory and censorious and critical of his son, and determined that his son was going to be sort of an upright man with a solid-gold reputation. and pierpont was not--he was not following in the paternal footsteps early on. he was much more likely to take r
to the folks in connecticut. having experienced not as large but a similar with representative deferreds who sat next to me on the floor of the senate our hearts and thoughts got to them. even though the secretary of state is the chief election officials in arizona, the real work mostly is, the county level. within our 15 counties we have the election directors who are very bipartisan, multi partisan coming and work across party lines with them, their counties and across the county lines to try to make sure that every arizonan that is eligible to vote gets to vote. we have a very dedicated people what the county levels since kind of a misnomer to say the chief elections officials is that the state and people get the idea of the state wins elections and it's really the counties to the arizona has been served very well by having local officials elected by their friends and neighbors in those counties and communities that conduct the elections and they are more than anyone else interested in making sure that all of their citizens who aren't eligible to vote get the right to do so and make it as
that was wrought throughout new york, new jersey, connecticut. we are still suffering gravely. there are still families that cannot return to their homes. there are businesses in the early stages of figuring out how to rebuild. the were so many lives lost so many families torn apart. i can tell you this is the job of the federal government. it isur job to protect people. it is our job to help communities rebuild when there are natural disasters that local governments just can't afford to be able to pay for on their own. now, new york has been working very hard to come up with a plan about how to rebuild. but the transportation infrastructure has taken an unbelievable beating. in new york alone, 2,000 miles of roads were destroyed or damage 11 tunnels were flooded. and our -- our city and our state really relies on mass transit. we are the number one users of mass transit in the country. and with our mass transit system, miles of tracks and tunnels were flooded with corrosive saltwater. 12 subway ations were damaged or destroyed, 500,000 transit riders are still experiencing severe disruptions.
's okay because in the middle of the night, there's this soldier from connecticut who was dumbing down help across the delaware, and will reach up and see this guy with a right to stick his arm out and grab him from his white horse. he told all his buddies this guys with this. leadership at all these elements. but anyway, washington's weaknesses make him just so much more brilliant. longmore, it should be noted, was a big activist in the handicapped rights movement, and i realized after i read this bugaboo, the kind of book where you're calling a to come and sing listen to this, listen to this. and i realized that he had typed the entire book -- [inaudible] and he had worked for disabled rights, and he, i him give a speech on video after i rea reae book but i realize hittite this, and he was giving a speech at another disabled rights, a memorial for another disabled rights person died and longmore said basically that this guy, you know, the movement made this great new. >> wanted to footnotes in the book made me read another book, which i hate reading books. but much more important we
, and connecticut. they know these places that have been hit so hard by sandy because they are their hometowns. that was really wonderful to see them come out and support their communities. we believe that $30 million was raised in ticket sales and we're still waiting for the final tally for all the donations called in from around the world last night. the money will go to hurricane victims through the robin hood foundation. a mazing effort last night. i only wish i had a ticket to see it in person. that's the latest from madison square garden. i'll send it back to you in the studio. >> steve: it was on 30 different tv channels. my wife watched the whole thing. >> brian: i think the dvd is going to be released. correct? >> steve: and you can buy the itunes songs and the money goes to robin hood. >> gretchen: i hoped you dvd, 'cause i didn't see one second. since the storm is going to cost $60 billion, hopefully a lot of this money will help defray some of those costs. >> brian: per state. >> steve: yeah. meanwhile, we got other stories making headlines on this thursday morning. while you were
. it is critical to remember that the new york-new jersey region, including connecticut, accounts for over 10% of the gdp of the country, well in excess of $1 trillion. protecting that and the tax revenues to the federal, state, and local governments that that economy generates is critical. that wealth-creating sector was basically shut down for days and in some cases by weeks by the storm appeared building to the standards in effect the day before the storm would peak in possible but also cost ineffective. rebuilding a system at the hoboken caissons would be impossible to do. last week research suggested their return from mitigation spending, especially with respect to flooding, is a national return of 5 to 1, a 14% return. given that these are long-lived transportation infrastructure assets, the return to the local, state, and federal governments of mitigation spending will be substantial, but will also protect this huge part of the nation's economy. >> senator, at the risk of repeating what has been say, i think, clearly, that mitigation is critical. we cannot just rebuild what was there,
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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